*ROHWER CENTER, LOYALTY MONUMENT - Desha County, Arkansas | LOYALTY MONUMENT *ROHWER CENTER - Arkansas Gravestone Photos

Loyalty Monument *ROHWER CENTER

Rohwer Relocation Center Cemetery
Desha County,
Arkansas

LOYALTY

Japanese-American Creed
I am an American of Japanese ancestry and appreciate the advantages of our nation. I glory in her heritage: I trust in her future. We are granted liberties and opportunities greater than anywhere in the world. We are entrusted with the responsibilities of the franchise; permitted to build a home; to earn a livelihood. To worship, think, speak and act as we please -- as a free man.

After Pearl Harbor, a wave of hysteria swept the country and nearly 112,000 Japanese-American citizens came under suspicion as to their loyalty to the United States. As a result, President Franklin D Roosevelt established the War Relocation Authority by Executive Order No. 9066 on May 18, 1942, with the power to relocate and intern those people of Japanese ancestry residing on the West Coast of the United States.
Under the Auspices of the War Relocation Authority, the Rohwer Relocation Center was established on September 18, 1942. The first of some 8,500 Japanese-Americans arrived at Rohwer for internment on that date.
In February, 1943, the US Army established the famed 100th Battalion and the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. An all Nisei unit, this unit served with great valor and distinguished itself in the European Theatre. Ironically, the families of this unit remained interned.
We are proud to remember that the 100th Battalion and the 442nd Regiment were the most highly decorated of all units during World War II. The most courageous and notable battles fought by the units included those at Salerno, Anzio, and Cassino. As well as the rescue of the Texas "Lost Battalion."
It should be remembered that during the internment years, thousands of Japanese-Americans volunteered or were drafted to serve in military intelligence operations with Japan. Three decades following the of World War II information was finally made public which described the valor and courage exhibited by these individuals and their secret contributions to the Pacific victory.
At the end of World War II, on November 30, 1945, the last Japanese-Americans left Rohwer, ending 3 1/2 years of internment.

This memorial is also dedicated to the memory of the many Japanese-Americans from Rohwer that gave their lives that others might enjoy the freedoms which they and their families were denied.

Contributed on 11/2/08 by tomtodd
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Record #: 91486

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Submitted: 11/2/08 • Approved: 11/4/08 • Last Updated: 7/21/12 • R91486-G0-S3

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