PHILLIPS, ZAN - Washington County, Arkansas | ZAN PHILLIPS - Arkansas Gravestone Photos

Zan PHILLIPS

Elm Springs Cemetery
Washington County,
Arkansas

Harlen
November 30, 1889 - February 4, 1914

Betty
March 1, 1882 - February 25, 1914

*Obituary
Benton County Democrat
Thursday, February 26, 1914

PHILLIPS, Bettie - {from The Rogers Daily Post, 25th} Miss Bettie, daughter of Wils Phillips, died last night of smallpox at the family home, two and a half miles east of Elm Springs

Zan
May 13, 1892 - February 18, 1914

"Three precious ones from us are gone, three voices we loved are stilled, three vacant places in our home, which never can be filled"

*Obituary
Rogers Democrat
Thursday, March 5, 1914

From a news story from Elm Springs, Washington Co., we give the following regarding the smallpox plague that has wrought so much sorrow in a number of the homes of that community. The disease first made its appearance in the village about six weeks ago when a small daughter of Mrs. Minnie White, a sister of Mrs. Carson, became ill. Mrs. White and the child were refugees from Mexico. On board a boat from Vera Cruz, where small-pox was prevalent, the sailors became fond of the child and played with her. The men had the disease but this was not learned until later and communicated it to the girl. She however did not become ill until after reaching Arkansas. The mother and Mrs. Carson attended the child. The former became ill but like her daughter, recovered. Mrs. White and the child then left the community. Mrs. Carson became ill and died. Her husband, who attended her, died three days later. Mrs. Holloway and Aaron, sister and brother of Mrs. Carson, contracted the disease while attending the stricken family. Holloway nursed his wife and died of the disease a week after Mrs. Holloway was buried. Harlan Phillips was a great friend of Bert Carson. Phillips became Carson's nurse. Carson died and Phillips took ill. He was placed in an attic at his father's home. Food and medical supplies were furnished him through a small opening that was cut in the house and reached by a ladder on the outside. His condition finally became so critical that he required constant attention. His brother volunteered his services, declaring at the time that he feared he would contract the disease and die. His prophecy proved true. He died a few days after his brother. His sister, Betty, who died today, went to her dying brother's assistance. When she became ill following the death of her second brother, she, too, declared she expected to die but like all the rest of the victims, declared she was ready for the end as she had performed a service that was expected of her. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips, parents of the children, took ill yesterday. A few days ago the father sent word to friends in Springdale that he expected the entire family would be wiped out by the disease. Cicero Reed, the farm hand, died Sunday. When the disease broke out in the Phillips home Reed remained away from the house. It is believed he contracted the disease from live stock on the farm that previously had been attended by the Phillips boys and their father. Frank Brown lives several miles south of the homes where the disease has claimed its victims. He has not been near those houses in a long time and has not communicated with any of the families that have had the disease. Two weeks ago while cutting wood Bert Carson's dog ran up to his side. Brown patted the dog on the head. Ten days later Brown had black smallpox. All dogs in the neighborhood have been killed.

*Obituary
Rogers Democrat
Thursday, February 26, 1914

PHILLIPS, Dan — {from The Springdale News} So far there have been seven deaths from smallpox, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Carson, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Holloway, Rel Aaron, Harlan and Dan Phillips. All these people contracted the disease from a family by the name of White, who came into this section a few weeks ago from Mexico. The family is related to the Carsons and stopped with them. The members of the White family had been vaccinated about three years ago and none of them ever contracted the disease but they brought it here in their clothing. The Holloways, Whites, Browns and Carsons are all related and the disease in the various families sprang from the same source.

Contributed on 12/1/07 by judyfrog
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Record #: 2716

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Submitted: 12/1/07 • Approved: 9/7/15 • Last Updated: 9/10/15 • R2716-G2714-S3

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